Legislation: California

Status:
Failed
Type:
Bill
Date:
April, 2010

AB 2176, the Lighting Toxics Reduction and Jobs in Recycling Act, introduced in February 2010, would have required producers of mercury containing lamps to develop, fund and manage a product stewardship program approved by the Department of Toxics Substances Control (DTSC). All mercury-containing lights collected by product stewardship programs must be recycled. In addition, lamps that do not contain...

Status:
Failed
Type:
Bill
Date:
February, 2010

AB 2139, the California Product Stewardship Act, introduced in February 2010, would set requirements for a producer of a covered product, to develop, finance and manage a stewardship program. 

Status:
Passed
Type:
Law
Date:
October, 2009

SB 486 passed in 2009, requires sharps manufacturers to create and publish a plan that describes "how the manufacturer supports the safe collection and proper disposal" of medical sharps. It became illegal in 2008 to knowingly dispose of sharps in the trash, due to the passage of SB...

Status:
Passed
Type:
Law
Date:
September, 2008

AB 2347 (PDF file, 152KB), signed into law on September 29, 2008, is known as the Mercury Thermostat Collection Act of 2008. The bill requires thermostat manufacturers to establish and maintain a take-back program for mercury-added thermostats. AB 2347 follows the mercury-added phase-out bill AB 1415 by targeting manufacturers which sold mercury-added thermostats before January 1, 2006.

Manufacturers have the option to create joint programs...

Status:
Passed
Type:
Law
Date:
September, 2008

SB 509 (PDF file, 79KB) signed into law on September 29, 2008, requires the Department of Toxic Substances Control to establish a Toxics Information Clearinghouse for the collection, maintenance, and distribution of specific chemical hazard traits and environmental and toxicological end-point data. The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment is required, by January 1, 2011, to evaluate and specify the hazard traits and environmental and toxicological end-...

Status:
Passed
Type:
Law
Date:
September, 2008

AB 1879 (PDF file, 170KB) signed into law on September 29, 2008, requires the state Department of Toxic Substances Control to establish a process to identify and regulate hazardous chemicals. The bill requires the department to prepare a life-cycle evaluation for all chemicals which would be submitted to the California Environmental Policy Council for review.

The department is also required to adopt regulations to establish...

Status:
Failed
Type:
Bill
Date:
February, 2008

SB 1713, introduced February 22, 2008, would require manufacturers to use the least toxic alternative when replacing phthalates in their products and apply the prohibition and least toxic alternative requirements to certain toys and child care articles that contain bisphenol A or lead in detectable levels.

Child care article is defined to include any product designed or intended by a manufacturer for use either on or by children. The Senate passed SB 1713 on...

Status:
Passed
Type:
Policy
Date:
January, 2008

On January 23, 2008, the California Integrated Waste Management Board (CIWMB) adopted Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) Framework Policy. Additional information is available from the CIWMB (now CalRecycle) and the California Product Stewardship Council.

In February 2007, the CIWMB adopted a set of Strategic Directives that included ...

Status:
Failed
Type:
Bill
Date:
January, 2008

AB 218, introduced on January 29, 2008, would amend Chapter 526 by re-defining the European Union’s RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC(PDF file, 114KB) term electronic equipment to mean a device that is dependent on electric currents or electromagnetic fields. Current California law defines electronic equipment only as video display devices.

The bill would exclude from the...

Status:
Passed
Type:
Other
Date:
January, 2008

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) Framework Policy was adopted by the CIWMB on January 23, 2008. The new EPR Framework Policy shifts the responsibility for managing products at the end-of-life from local governments to producers who can internalize the costs of product collection, transportation, and recycling/disposal.

The new policy provides stronger state regulations, realistic product selection and goal setting, and flexible oversight of product stewardship programs managed by...

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